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Performance poetry

 Subject
Subject Source: Sackner Database

Found in 901 Collections and/or Records:

cahiers de la 5th feuille, les. No.4/Apr / Julien Blaine., 2004

 Item
Identifier: CC-44627-46790
Scope and Contents

In this issue, vulvae are a visual topic; Blaine likens the vulva to differing typographic parentheses. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 2004

Cahiers Loques: Happenings, Interventions et Actions Diverses. / Jean-Jacques Lebel., 1982

 Item
Identifier: CC-16664-17019
Scope and Contents

This book consists of photographs of erotic happenings. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1982

Calling / Kaprow, Allan; Higgins, Dick., 1967

 Item
Identifier: CC-50273-71340
Scope and Contents Dick Higgins comments are printed on the verso of the plywood cover. They read "Calling, a Happening by Allan Kaprow performed in and out of New York in the summer of 1965, is one of the landmarks of the form, and its scenario typifies the poetic rictual syle he has developed. This present graphic representation, however, began as an improvision when Kaprow, playing with a set of rubber stamp letters, stamped out each word of the scenario on a separate index card. I continued the game by assembling the cards on the copyboard of a graphic arts camera and shooting themby adding an element of color play. The resulting object os not, however, a final one in any sense. While the original acenario may be read by starting from bottom to top, right hand column to left hand, on the silver, blue, red, yellow, and, finally, brown sheets, there are other stories which the reader is invited to tell, other games for him to play." Kaprow died at age 78 years in San Diego on April 5, 2006 --...
Dates: 1967

Cantatrix Sopranica L. - Scientific Papers, 2008

 Item
Identifier: CC-55668-9999268
Scope and Contents

From the back cover: "George Perec (1936-1982) became the most celebrated French author of his generation, his novel 'Life A User's Manual" winning the Prix Medicis in 1978. From the start he was fascinated by the possibility of employing non-fictional languages for altogether more mischievous purposes and this book ccollects together various texts in which he uses the expressionless terminology of sociology, entomology and linguistics to achieve effects they are distinctly designed to avoid. Perec was an illustrious member of the Oulipo, a group of writers which is still very much active, and who explore the possibilities of artifiical systems in literature...Not surprisingly, the present book is "experimental", but it is also strange, preposterous, and wrily intertaining." -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 2008

canvas in three movements / Fernbach-Flarsheim, Carl., 1965

 Item
Identifier: CC-12831-13118
Scope and Contents

The artist has typed "instructions are same as on photo of canvas for two performers." -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1965

Cavellini Yesterday, Cavellini Today, Cavellini Tomorrow / Cavellini, Guglielmo Achille., 1981

 Item
Identifier: CC-18933-19311
Scope and Contents

Cavellini appears in suits of labels. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1981

Centerfold: Television and Video Reports. / Marcella Bienvenue, Clive Robertson, editors ; Coutts-Smith K ; General Idea ; Robertson C., 1978

 Item
Identifier: CC-58977-10002168
Scope and Contents

The cover and formatof this magazine mimis "Time magazine." -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1978

Chamber Music / Cobbing, Bob., 1966

 Item
Identifier: CC-17589-17955
Scope and Contents

Although Cobbing is not generally thought of as producing language poetry, the clusters of seemingly meaningless words and unrelated phrases could place this book into such a category. It is of interest that Cobbing had later collaborations with Bruce Andrews, a recognized language poet. The work might also have originated from the cut-up technique but handwritten notes (Notes for (from) Chamber Music), held by the Sackner Archive suggest the former expalanation. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1966

Chamber Music / Cobbing, Bob., 1966

 Item
Identifier: CC-17590-17956
Scope and Contents

Although Cobbing is not generally thought of as composing language poetry, the clusters of seemingly meaningless words and unrelated phrases could place this book into such a category. It is of interest that Cobbing had later collaborations with Bruce Andrews, a recognized language poet. The work might also have originated from the cut-up technique but handwritten notes (Notes for (from) Chamber Music), held by the Sackner Archive suggest the former explanation. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1966

Chamber Music: Working Copy / Cobbing, Bob., 1966

 Item
Identifier: CC-17458-17824
Scope and Contents

Cobbing provides handwritten instructions for reading and ordering the sequence of each part of the poem, e.g. slow to lively, slow solemn, quick lively etc. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1966

Chanting / Morrow, Charlie ; Hawk, Mary Nell., 1991

 Item
Identifier: CC-06103-6217
Scope and Contents

This is a reprint of a book first published in 1976. Morrow states that Individual Chanting is listening to the self while making breath & voice sound. He adds that Breathing is universal language and notes that a person can go through a wide range o emotions from depression to exhilaration by breathing differently. Unlike singing, which can stop, the breath goes on even if the breather doesn't want it to...the emotions carried by the breath are readable by others and perhaps by animals. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1991

Chanting / Morrow, Charlie ; Hawk, Mary Nell., 1991

 Item
Identifier: CC-06104-6218
Scope and Contents

This is a reprint of a book first published in 1976. Morrow states that Individual Chanting is listening to the self while making breath & voice sound. He adds that Breathing is universal language and notes that a person can go through a wide range o emotions from depression to exhilaration by breathing differently. Unlike singing, which can stop, the breath goes on even if the breather doesn't want it to...the emotions carried by the breath are readable by others and perhaps by animals. -- Source of annotation: Marvin or Ruth Sackner.

Dates: 1991